DRC Juniors Weekly Round Up

Another fairly quiet week with some great performances at the Midsummer Open, although owing to the football perhaps, lower attendance this week than the week before. Thursday athletics included some less well practised events; discus and triple jump to mention a couple.

Mini Athletics is well subscribed and we have plans for delivery of that. We think we will need some more adult help though, so if you are available to help at any of these sessions please let me know.

Advanced Athletics looks like it may move, as a few have stated a preference for Sundays. Dave is liaising directly on this programme though so please speak to Dave if you have thoughts on this.

Meanwhile I have been busy planning ahead; 21st July for summer championship. 8th Sep Try Out Tri. Autumn (Kickstart) Athletics programme to start in Sep. Indoor Athletics hopefully in January, and more Yate sessions (on their new track) for the summer of 2019!

Just a reminder if you need dates, location or registration details for any of our events or programmes I keep our website calendar updated and links to our various forms are here too.

Have a great week!

DRC Juniors Weekly Round Up

Wednesday saw the first of the Midsummer Open events. See post by Dave for results. Thursday was another warm evening of athletics training on the track. I was busy taking lots of photos.

DRC July Challenge – Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better (or Boys v Girls)

NERD alert: A few years ago I analysed the results of various DRC challenges and compared the top ten men’s results against the top ten women’s results. It suggested that on average I would have to make the men run 19% further than the women in order to create a “level playing field”.

I put this to the test with the original ‘Any Way You Please’ challenge in 2016 where the women had to visit four checkpoints while the men had to visit five checkpoints which meant they had to run 19% further. This resulted in a mixed male & female podium in the individual event and a female team narrowly beating a male team if I remember correctly, so I was very happy with the result.
I have just done a similar analysis on the results of this year’s 1st club handicap; with pretty much the same outcome. The numbers suggest that a 19% distance handicap for the men is still about right. Thus the DRC July challenge was born.
So, ladies, you have to run from the golf clubhouse, down the Cotswold Way to Nibley and up to the Tyndale monument, and then back again to the golf clubhouse, a distance of 4.30 miles. Chaps, you have to start at the wooden bench at Drakestone Point, running off the end of the hill and then following the path which leads you back around the edge of the golf course through the walkers’ car park and then down to the Cotswold Way. You then follow the same route as the ladies to Nibley monument and then back again FINISHING AT THE GOLF CLUBHOUSE, a distance of 5.13 miles – a difference of c.19%. This will create two separate leader-boards which I will combine through the magic of an Excel spreadsheet.

There will be an individual podium for the top three fastest runners overall regardless of gender.

BOYS v GIRLS

I will also compare the men’s and women’s results in batches of 5. I will add up the times of the men in 1st to 5th places and compare this with the total time of the women from 1st to 5th on their respective leader-boards. I will then compare the total time of the men from 6th to 10th against the total time of the women from 6th to 10th – then 11th to 15h and 16th to 20th and so on. Every time the men beat the women they will score a point, and vica versa for each time the women are quicker. Once a side runs out of runners the other side will automatically score a point for every complete batch of 5 runners remaining, so everyone’s result will count towards the team effort and it will be important to get a good turnout. The winner of the ‘Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better’ challenge will be the gender that scores the most points. All just for fun of course and not to be taken too seriously!
Let the battle commence.

Women’s route: https://www.strava.com/routes/13669617 (4.30 miles)
Men’s route: https://www.strava.com/routes/13669689 (5.13 miles)

DRC Juniors Weekly Round Up

So many podium paces! We have had a great week in the competitions. Check out the photos.

Of the results I can find:

  • Liam – Cheltenham U14 Championship: 1st shot put, 3rd vortex
    Holly – Cheltenham U14 Championship: 3rd speed bounce, 3rd long jump, 3rd 600m, 1st hurdles, 2nd vortex
  • Tom – Cheltenham U14 Championship: 2nd high jump, 3rd long jump
  • Jack B – Cheltenham U14 Championship: 1st high jump, 2nd 800m, 1st vortex, 1st 1500m
  • Jack – Cheltenham U14 Championship: 3rd high jump
    Harry – Cheltenham U14 Championship: 3rd long jump, 2nd vortex
  • Jake – Berkeley Castle Dash – 10k winner male under 13

So all that training has paid off on the day.

This week included the usual Wednesday and Thursday training sessions too. They were hot sessions, but we had some really good skills development on display (and some incredibly high standing hurdle jumps).

The Midsummer series starts on Wednesday this week, so for the U13 group upwards more opportunities to test out that training. For more information and to register follow this link.

Coming up:

  • Summer Championship Event 21st July at Dursley Rugby Club.
  • Mini Athletics (for 4-7 year olds) at Dursley Rugby Club; 10.00-10.30 on 28/07, 04/08, 11/08, 18/08, 25/08. Register here >>.
  • Advanced Athletics (for 14-18 year olds) at Dursley Rugby Club; 9.45-10.30 on 28/07, 04/08, 11/08, 18/08, 25/08. Register here >>.

Have a great week,

Caroline

DRC Junior Chair & Coach

Running in the Heat

With safety and welfare in mind and the hot weather due to continue into next week please see below for some some useful guidance on the dangers of running in hot weather (link here) and some tips for reducing the effects of the heat.
 

 

Five Tips for Running in the Heat:

Hot weather might be a rare issue when you’re running in the UK but if you are training abroad, or competing in a marathon that takes place in sunnier climes, it can create some real challenges. Next time you’re looking to survive a run under the sun, follow our top five tips to help you keep your cool.

Dress appropriately

Make sure you are wearing lightly coloured and loose-fitting running gear. Pale colours reflect the sun’s rays better and baggy clothes help take advantage of any breeze, including the one you make yourself by running. Technical t-shirts can allow sweat to pass through them and evaporate, which keeps your core temperature lower. Sunglasses and waterproof sunscreen are a necessity, while a hat or visor to protect your face is also a good idea. Don’t go for a tight-fitting hat or one made from thick material though, as it is important to lose heat through your head.

Get your timing right

When training in the heat, you should avoid running between midday and 15:00 when the sun is at its strongest. Most marathons in hot countries will bear that in mind when arranging their start times. The air quality is also at its best in the morning, making this an ideal time to run. Sticking to routes that provide a lot of shade can make a difference too.

Keep hydrated

If you’re running for 45 minutes or less, drinking water alone is fine. But if you’re going for longer, and especially for marathon distances, you should ideally consume around 235ml of sports drink every 20 minutes to help maintain electrolyte levels and refuel your muscles (if you don’t want to spend all that money on sports drinks, 1 litre of ribena with 1.5grams of salt is a lot cheaper). Even if you don’t feel thirsty, drink at least 225ml of fluid each hour. You should be hydrated ahead of your run too – drinking 450ml of water two hours before you start will ensure you’re well set. Work out the easiest way for you to carry bottles while you’re out and about, whether that be in a bag, a holster, or simply in your hand. Different people prefer different methods but there is always a way. Avoid drinks with caffeine and alcohol before runs as they increase urine output which can make you even more dehydrated.

Start slowly and know when to stop

When the sun is beating down, it’s particularly beneficial to start your run a bit slower than usual. If you normally run at eight-minute mile pace, try to run 10-minute miles – it will take you longer to overheat. If you feel you’re becoming too hot, know when to stop as heat-induced illness can be serious. Headaches, confusion, loss of muscular control, hot and cold flushes, over-sweating, clammy skin and an upset stomach are all signs of impending heat illness. If you feel any of these, seek shade, drink and try and get yourself a ride home.

Make use of water

Obviously, if you’re heading overseas to run a marathon, you’ll have to stick to the course planned by the organisers, but if you’re training in the heat, try to choose a route that passes near water. It is usually cooler and breezier near water so running alongside it can help keep your core temperature down. Whether you run next to a river, stream, lake or even the sea, the lower temperature should make you feel a lot less tired. Marathon organisers in hot countries know this – the likes of the Rio de Janeiro and Dubai Marathons both take place next to the sea. Finishing your run with a brief swim can also be a good way to cool down quickly on a hot day.

Keep safe,

Caroline